TU's Women's and Gender Studies Department Blog!

thehalloweennegras:

Do me a favor and spread these like wildfire. 

All Credit goes to the Ohio University STARS (Students Teaching About Racism in Society) group

parisian-catacombs:

nlmsbb:

prettieandsick:

I think the concept of virginity was created by men who thought their penises were so important it changes who a woman is.

realist shit I have ever read.

a-great—perhaps:

uncensoredsupplement:

Check it out. Tell me what you think!

My amazing boyfriend’s amazing snarky post taking down the whole “white student union” debacle at Towson University, which he attends. Everyone ought to read this, it’s the perfect type of anger-inspired humor.

Only at Towson

queeruption:

Are We Born Gay? And If We Were, How Would We Know?

Carey Faulkner, a visiting Assistant Professor at Franklin & Marshall, asked us to post about a blog that has recently gotten quite a bit of attention: Born this Way.  The site posts photographs of gay-identified adults as children.  Submitters argue that the photographs are proof that they were born gay.

Perusing the photographs tells an interesting story: being gay — that is, beingsexuallysexually or romantically attracted to members of the same sex — is conflated with being gender non-conformist — adopting the mannerisms and interests of the other sex.  This is the argument made in the vast majority of posts: it’s obvious I was gay because I broke rules of masculinity/femininity.

It is a specifically American belief that gay men act feminine and lesbians act masculine.  But, in fact, gay men and lesbians have a wide range of gender performances, as do straight and bisexual people.  In fact, most of us could probably find a picture or two in our histories showing gender non-conformity.  Meanwhile, most gay men and lesbians could probably find pictures of themselves conforming.  That gender performance is associated with sexual orientation in our society is a belief in U.S. culture, but it’s not somehow inevitable or biological.

Nevertheless, the site perpetuates this conflation in an effort to support the notion that being gay is biological.  In contrast to this assertion, however, excellent research has shown that there is no trans-cultural, trans-historical gay identity and interpretations of same-sex sexual behavior vary wildly (see, for example, Herdt’s Same Sex, Different Cultures, DeEmilio’s Capitalism and Gay Identity, and Katz’s The Invention of Heterosexuality).  And genetic, hormonal, and neurological research has thus far failed to show conclusively that being gay is biological, let alone that it is biologically determined or that it manifests in gender non-conformity.

Still, many gay men, lesbians, and their allies desperately want to prove that being gay is biological on the assumption that showing so will mean that intolerant people will be forced to accept them.  But this simply isn’t true.  People who are against homosexuality will likely just re-define their opposition.  Instead of saying that being gay is a sinful choice, they could simply argue that it is a disease, like cancer, or a deformity, like a cleft palate.  They say so already:

When an individual is not drawn to a member of the opposite sex, in biology that’s called an error.
- Dr. Laura Schlessinger

Homosexuality is a disability and if people wish to have it eliminated before they have children—because they wish to have grandchildren or for other reasons—I do not see any moral objection for using genetic engineering to limit this particular trend. It would be like correcting many other conditions such as infertility or multiple sclerosis.

- Former Chief Rabbi of the United Kingdom, Lord Jakobovits

I appreciate what Born This Way is trying to accomplish, but I don’t think that convincing people that homosexuality is biological will have the effect many hope for.

feministdisney:

“Think before you Pink.”
I was hoping this image would come up on my dash and I could reblog it from someone with more expertise, but I haven’t seen it outside of facebook yet.
Some things to keep in mind:
Make awareness about the individual and their struggles with cancer, NOT about “boobies” and “saving breasts.”   Many breast cancer survivors DO lose their breasts and positing awareness as a movement to “save their breasts” diminishes our need to focus on supporting the people.   Whether or not they chose/need to undergo a mastectomy is not really your business or concern.
“Saying that we should work to cure this disease because it threatens breasts is really upsetting. For starters, it suggests that women are worth saving because they’re attached to breasts, rather than the other way around. But worse, it tells any woman who’s had a life-saving mastectomy that she’s given up the thing that made people care about her survival. What a punch in the stomach.”  -Randal Munroe, of XKCD
Think twice about supporting companies that seem more concerned about using Breast Cancer Awareness and its ever-increasing popularity to sell their product, rather than concerned about actually supporting and assisting those struggling/those who will battle with breast cancer/with finding a cure
For alternative organizations to support, Kate Madonna Hindes recommends Breast Cancer Action. “They are INCREDIBLE and do work that focuses ALL on prevention.”
For further info:
The Trouble with Pink (Kate Madonna Hindes)
5 Ways to Move Beyond Pinkwashing to Really Fight for a Cure on Huffpost
Unraveling the Ribbon on Bitch Magazine

feministdisney:

“Think before you Pink.”

I was hoping this image would come up on my dash and I could reblog it from someone with more expertise, but I haven’t seen it outside of facebook yet.

Some things to keep in mind:

  • Make awareness about the individual and their struggles with cancer, NOT about “boobies” and “saving breasts.”   Many breast cancer survivors DO lose their breasts and positing awareness as a movement to “save their breasts” diminishes our need to focus on supporting the people.   Whether or not they chose/need to undergo a mastectomy is not really your business or concern.
“Saying that we should work to cure this disease because it threatens breasts is really upsetting. For starters, it suggests that women are worth saving because they’re attached to breasts, rather than the other way around. But worse, it tells any woman who’s had a life-saving mastectomy that she’s given up the thing that made people care about her survival. What a punch in the stomach.”  -Randal Munroe, of XKCD
  • Think twice about supporting companies that seem more concerned about using Breast Cancer Awareness and its ever-increasing popularity to sell their product, rather than concerned about actually supporting and assisting those struggling/those who will battle with breast cancer/with finding a cure
For further info:
The Trouble with Pink (Kate Madonna Hindes)
Unraveling the Ribbon on Bitch Magazine

harmreduction:

If someone says “I am a woman,” or “I am a man,” or “I am ____,” please take that person seriously. Our cultural framework tends to tell us that their bodies may contradict their statements — that there’s no way you could be a guy with XX chromosomes, or a genderless person with an obvious beard. But the trans person is the one who’s right, and the simplistic framework is the model that’s wrong. Gender is not dependent on physical appearances, or on the word of doctors, friends, family. The individuals are the ones who get to assert their own identity.

- TransWhat? is a site dedicated to supporting people in being better allies to trans people.

The lighter-skinned you are, the more sympathy you receive. The darker you are, the less sympathy you receive. Plain and simple.

queerqueenofcolor:

However, let’s take care to mind that the “sympathy” light-skinned PoC receive is still racism. It’s the same sort of paternalistic jive that upwardly mobile light-skinned East Asians get for being “Model Minorities”. Benevolent racism needs to be talked about more.